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City Rescue Mission Brings Back Thanksgiving Banquet

More than 350 people gathered for a hot Thanksgiving meal Thursday at Oklahoma City’s City Rescue Mission for the first time in two years. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the agency distributed Thanksgiving boxes to those who found themselves in difficult situations during the holiday. “They’re just having a tougher season,” said Stacey Cato, a City Rescue Mission volunteer. “They may need a little more love and support right now, but they’re just like us.”| MORE | Oklahoma City-area shelters offer free Thanksgiving mealsThis Thanksgiving marked the first time families affected by homelessness have been able to sit at a table with volunteers since the pandemic. “We’d probably have turkey sandwiches at home,” said Michael Platt, whose family attended the dinner. The Platt family said times have been tough and the economy has forced them to forego nonessentials. “It takes a family that really sticks together,” Platt said. The participants of the event could eat together and spend time together. “My family raised us to pay attention to people going through tough times,” Cato said. “This was an opportunity for us to bring our children today and to love someone who might need an extra blessing today.” More than 150 volunteers spent their Thanksgiving ministering to others and sponsoring over 40 tables.

More than 350 people gathered for a hot Thanksgiving meal Thursday at Oklahoma City’s City Rescue Mission for the first time in two years.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the agency distributed Thanksgiving boxes to those who found themselves in difficult situations during the holiday.

“They’re just having a tougher season,” said Stacey Cato, a City Rescue Mission volunteer. “They might need a little more love and support right now, but they’re just like us.”

| MORE | Shelters in the Oklahoma City area offer free Thanksgiving meals

This Thanksgiving marked the first time since the pandemic that families affected by homelessness have been able to sit around a table with volunteers.

“We’d probably have turkey sandwiches at home,” said Michael Platt, whose family attended the dinner.

The Platt family said times have been tough and the economy has forced them to forego nonessentials.

“It takes a family that really sticks together,” Platt said.

The participants of the event could eat together and spend time together.

“My family raised us to pay attention to people going through tough times,” Cato said. “This was a chance for us to bring our kids today and love someone who might need a few extra blessings today.”

More than 150 volunteers spent their Thanksgiving serving others and sponsoring over 40 tables.

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