Carolina

Carolina lawmakers are working to protect substations

RELATED TO TURNING FEES. South Carolina Attorney General ALAN WILSON CALLS ON CONGRESS TO PASS LEGISLATION THAT ALLOWS STATE PRISONS TO JAMMER SIGNALS OF ILLEGAL CELLPHONES. AG WILSON JOINS 21 OTHER STATES, INCLUDING GEORGIA, IN THE EFFORT. HE SAYS FOR THE LAST FIVE YEARS, HIS OFFICE HAS HANDLED MAJOR DRUG TRAFFICKING CASES WHERE INTENTS USING CONFIDENT CELLPHONES ORGANIZED DRUG RINGS BEHIND PUBLIC BARS. THE LAST ARE LOST IN BACKSTATE AREAS. IN 2021, THE FCC ANNOUNCED THAT IT WOULD GIVE STATES THE TECHNOLOGY TO POINT CONFIDENT CELLPHONES AND THEN SEND THE INFORMATION TO THE CELLULAR PROVIDER, WHICH MAY BE SHUTDOWN WITHIN FIVE DAYS OF NOTICE. SOUTH CAROLINA WAS THE FIRST APPLICANT FOR THE TECHNOLOGY. BRIAN STERLING, DIRECTOR OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS, SAYS HE IS STILL WAITING FOR THE NEXT STEP OF APPROVAL. LEGISLATORS IN THE CAROLINAS ARE WORKING ON GRID SECURITY. IT COMES AFTER SEVERAL VANDALISM AND SHOOTING BETWEEN AT ELECTRICAL SUBSTATIONS. PEYTON FURTADO TALKS TO LEGISLATORS WHO PROPOSE NEW LEGISLATION AND THE PEOPLE WHO COULD MOST INFLUENCE THEM. MONTHS AFTER A SHOT AT A SUBSTATION left power out to more than 34,000 people, lawmakers are working to ensure power plants like this one are protected. BUSINESSES HAVE CLOSED. SCHOOLS WERE CLOSED. IT JUST LOOKED LIKE A GHOST TOWN. SINCE THIS, MORE POWER EQUIPMENT HAS BEEN TARGETED OR VANDALIZED IN NORTH CAROLINA AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. LAST YEAR ALONE, DOMINION POWER SAYS SOUTH CAROLINA HAD 12 OF THESE INCIDENTS. YOU ARE NOT IN NORTH CAROLINA. RICHMOND AND MOORE COUNTIES REPRESENTATIVE DRAFTS LEGISLATION THAT MUST ENERGY COMPANIES PROVIDE 24-HOUR SECURITY AT ALL ITS SUB-SUBSTITUTIONS. WE NOW LIVE IN AN AGE WHERE YOU CAN DO A LOT WITH CAMERAS, LIGHTING, SOUND DETECTION AND SUCH THINGS. BUT SOME PLACES NEED MORE PROTECTION THAN OTHERS. AS WE NOTED IN SOUTH CAROLINA, STATE SENATORS ARE DISCUSSING ONE ACT THAT INCREASES THE PENALTY FOR USE OF A GUN, ANOTHER THAT CREATES A SCALE OF PENALTY FOR ATTACKS BASED ON THE AMOUNT OF DAMAGE AND INJURIES THEY CAUSE. A POWER FAILURE FOR MY MOTHER, FOR EXAMPLE, IS NO CIRCUMSTANCE. IT IS A LIFE OR DEATH SITUATION BECAUSE IT IS 24 SEVEN DEPENDENT ON OXYGEN COMING FROM A PLUG OXYGEN CONCENTRATOR. HANEY’S MOTHER LIVES IN SOUTH CAROLINA, FAR FROM HOSPITALS. WHEN THE POWER FAILED IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT IN JUNE, HER MOTHER WAKE UP TO LOW OXYGEN LEVELS AND NO POWER SOURCE NEARBY. I THINK IT’S A QUESTION OF SAFETY. IT’S A SECURITY OF LIFE OR DEATH. MOSS’ LEGISLATION IS IN ITS FINAL DRAFT STATE AND COULD BE DISCONTINUED ANY DAY NOW. IN THE MEANTIME, HE MEETS WITH ENERGY PROFESSIONALS, ENERGY COMPANIES AND LEGISLATORS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE AID. I THINK THAT THE BEAUTY OF THIS ACT, THAT THIS IS IN THE DRAFT, IS NOT A PARTICAN PROBLEM. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC AND IT DOESN’T MATTER IF YOUR ENERGY GOES THERE, EVERYONE LOSE.

‘A matter of life or death’: Carolina lawmakers work to protect substations after a massive power outage in Moore County

North and South Carolina lawmakers are working to ensure substations are protected.


Months after a shooting at a substation cut power to more than 34,000 people, lawmakers in North and South Carolina are working to ensure electrical substations are protected. On December 3, 2022, someone shot and damaged two substations in Moore County, North Carolina. leaving the country folk in the dark and cold for days. “Businesses have been shut down, schools have been shut down,” said NC Representative Ben Moss. “It just looked like a ghost town.” That’s why Moss, representing Richmond and Moore counties, is drafting a bill that would require energy companies to provide 24-hour security at all substations. Since then, other power plants in North Carolina, Oregon, Nevada and Washington have been shelled or destroyed. Dominion Power said in an SC Senate subcommittee meeting that the state had 12 of those incidents in the last year alone. “We live in a time where you can do a lot with cameras, lighting, sound recognition and things like that. But some places need more protection than others, we found,” Moss said. In South Carolina, senators are working to pass two bills, one increasing the penalty if a gun is used and another introducing a penalty scale for attackers based on the amount of damage they cause and whether someone is injured or dies from a power failure. “A power outage for my mother, for example, isn’t an inconvenience; it’s a life and death situation,” said Shawn Haney, a resident of Upstate South Carolina. “She depends on oxygen 24 hours a day, which comes from a plug-in oxygen concentrator.” Haney’s mother lives in South Carolina, a good drive from any hospital. She will never be forgotten if the power went out in the middle of the night. Her mother woke up with low oxygen levels and no power source nearby. “I think it’s a matter of safety and security and it’s a matter of life or death,” she said. Moss’ bill is in final stages and could be unveiled any day now. In the meantime, he said, he’s meeting with energy experts, energy companies and lawmakers on both sides of the aisles. “Democrat, Republican, it doesn’t matter. When the energy runs out, everyone loses it.”

Months after a shooting at a substation cut power to more than 34,000 people, lawmakers in North and South Carolina are working to ensure electrical substations are protected.

On December 3, 2022, someone shot and damaged two substations in Moore County, North Carolina, leaving country residents in the dark and cold for days.

“Businesses have been shut down, schools have been shut down,” said NC Representative Ben Moss. “It just looked like a ghost town.”

That’s why Moss, representing Richmond and Moore counties, is drafting a bill that would require energy companies to provide 24-hour security at all substations. Since then, other power plants in North Carolina, Oregon, Nevada and Washington have been shelled or destroyed.

Dominion Power said in an SC Senate subcommittee meeting that the state had 12 of those incidents in the last year alone.

“We live in a time where you can do a lot with cameras, lighting, sound detection and things like that. But some places need more protection than others, we found,” Moss said.

In South Carolina, state senators are working on passing two laws, one increasing the penalty for using a gun and the other establishing a penalty scale for attackers based on the amount of damage they cause and whether someone is injured or dies from a power failure.

“A power outage for my mother, for example, isn’t an inconvenience; it’s a life and death situation,” said Shawn Haney, a resident of Upstate South Carolina. “She relies on 24/7 oxygen, which comes from a plug-in oxygen concentrator.”

Haney’s mother lives in South Carolina, a good drive from any hospital. She will never be forgotten if the power went out in the middle of the night. Her mother woke up with low oxygen levels and no power source nearby.

“I think it’s a safety issue, and a safety issue, and it’s a matter of life or death,” she said.

Moss’ bill is in the final stages of drafting and could be introduced any day now. In the meantime, he said, he’s meeting with energy experts, energy companies and lawmakers on both sides of the aisles.

“I think the beauty of this bill is that it’s not a party issue,” Moss said. “Democrat, Republican, it doesn’t matter. When the power runs out, everyone loses it.”

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