Oklahoma

A new bill tabled in the Oklahoma Capitol aims to make voting changes

A new bill tabled in the Oklahoma Capitol aims to make changes to the ballot. She claims it gives major parties an unfair advantage while making it almost impossible for independents to be elected to have a fair chance,” said Senator Mary Boren, D-Norman. If I vote for a direct party in a heavily dominated Democratic seat, it would actually benefit me to stick with voting for direct parties because there are many Democrats who also vote for a direct party,” Boren said The recent rule change in the Capitol has angered some Oklahoma lawmakers. Even if Oklahoma voters want to change the structure of their ballots, voters use direct party voting. In November, 480,000 voters chose a pure party vote. Nearly 70% were for Republicans , and the remaining direct party voters were largely supportive of the Democrats. After other states have reversed or abolished direct party voting in the past, KOCO 5 asked what Oklahoma’s way of doing it is.” Oh yeah, I agree with that Totally Agree I think one thing I’ve done, even with my minimum wage bill, is file bills that say: “Could inspire our nonpartisan groups with the language, which could morph into an own initiative petition,” Boren said. Whether or not this bill gets anywhere in the State Capitol will become clear during the upcoming session, which is scheduled to begin on February 6th.

A new bill tabled in the Oklahoma Capitol aims to make voting changes.

A Norman state senator wants to abolish bipartisan voting. She claims it gives big parties an unfair advantage while making it nearly impossible for independents to get elected.

“We’ve actually had candidates in Norman, in Cleveland County, running as independents, and the direct vote has really hampered their ability to have a fair chance,” said Senator Mary Boren, D-Norman.

Boren argues that eliminating such a practice would make major parties more accountable, whether Republican or Democrat, in the counties where they have a stronghold.

“If a straight party votes for me in a heavily dominated Democratic seat, I would actually benefit from voting the straight party because there are a lot of Democrats who also vote for a straight party,” Boren said.

| MORE | The recent rule change at the Capitol has angered some Oklahoma lawmakers

Even when Oklahoma voters want to change the structure of their ballots, voters use direct party voting. In November, 480,000 voters chose a pure party.

Nearly 70% pro-Republicans, and the remaining straight party voters broadly supported Democrats.

Because other states have reversed or abolished direct party voting in the past, KOCO 5 asked Oklahoma’s path to doing so.

“Oh yes, I totally agree. I think I submitted bills despite my minimum wage bill that could inspire our bipartisan groups with the language that could turn into an own initiative petition,” Boren said.

Whether or not this bill gets anywhere in the State Capitol will become clear during the upcoming session, which is scheduled to begin on February 6th.

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